National Transport Museum

The Transport Museum Society of Ireland began with an abortive 1949 effort to preserve three Dublin trams. Totally voluntary, the Society became a limited company in 1971 and is now a registered charity, operating to international museum standards.

Sixty out of the 100 vehicles currently in Howth are on display, and others can be inspected by prior arrangement. The oldest items date from 1883 and the newest 1984.

Howth isn’t just rich in maritime history, The National Transport Museum strives to collect and preserve the vehicles that we no longer regard with such appreciation as we once did. 

“Preserved vehicles are an unrivalled repository of social history, stimulating pride in the past and inspiration for the future.

In 1973, when we had 25 vehicles, a survey of the principal vehicle types then working in Ireland led to the compilation of a Forward Preservation List setting out well in advance what should be preserved. Regularly updated, the list has served all interests well ever since. Vehicles come by donation, loan or purchase, are held so as to preclude sale or export and are listed in a register of artefacts.

On 1st September 2001, the collection, increasing at an annual average rate of five, totalled 170 (average age 46 years). Sixty out of the 100 vehicles currently in Howth are on display, and others can be inspected by prior arrangement. The oldest items date from 1883, the newest 1984, the more modem vehicles occupying a twilight zone between obsolescence and future antique status. Serious space limitations and the need to house every vehicle result in having to display the exhibits more closely than is desirable. The collection is divided into five main standalone categories. These are Passenger, Commercial, Fire & Emergency, Military and Utility”.

National Transport Museum
(01) 848 0831
www.nationaltransportmuseum.org